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Cleveland County 2020 election results: live updates

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Vote Sign(copy) (copy)

A voting sign at University Lutheran Church on Aug. 28, 2018.

Check back here for live results from the Cleveland County 2020 election!

Complete Oklahoma election results can be found here.

10:49 p.m.

State Question 802 to expand Medicaid coverage passed narrowly with 50.48 percent of the vote.

10:35 p.m.

Norman City Councilmember Alex Scott has won the democratic primary for Oklahoma's 15th District State Senate seat against Matt Hecox with 61.17 percent of the vote. Scott will face off against incumbent Sen. Rob Standridge in the general election this November.

9:38 p.m.

With 92.25 percent reporting, the margin between Yes and No on SQ802 has tightened even more, with 50.54 percent Yes and 49.46 percent No.

9:28 p.m.

With 100 percent of Cleveland County reporting, Norman City Councilmember Alex Scott has won Cleveland County for Oklahoma's 15th District State Senate seat. One precinct remains statewide.

9:10 p.m.

The margin between Yes and No votes on SQ802 continues to tighten, with Yes at 50.8 percent and No at 49.2 percent with 82 percent of precincts reporting.

9:01 p.m.

Elizabeth Foreman has beat incumbent Norman City Councilmember Bill Scanlon for the Ward 6 seat, with 52.1 percent of the vote to Scanlon's 47.49 percent.

8:47 p.m.

With one precinct remaining, Norman City Councilmember Alex Scott has maintained her substantial lead over Matt Hecox in Cleveland Co., at 60 percent to his 40 percent. Three precincts remain statewide.

8:45 p.m.

With nearly 75 percent of precincts reporting, the margin between Yes and No votes on SQ 802 has tightened, with Yes at 51.54 percent and No at 48.46 percent.

8:35 p.m.

According to the AP, Mary Brannon has won the U.S. House of Representatives Democratic primary. Brannon will face U.S. Rep. Tom Cole in November.

8:25 p.m.

With 25.86 percent of precincts reporting, Yes on State Question 802 for Medicaid Expansion has, at 60.39 percent, a commanding lead over those against, at 39.61 percent.

8:20 p.m.

With 66.7 percent of precincts reporting, Elizabeth Foreman has a slight edge over incumbent Norman City Councilmember Bill Scanlon for the Ward 6 seat. Foreman has 52.95 percent of the vote, and Scanlon has 47.05.

8:15 p.m.

With 55.17 percent of precincts recording, Norman City Councilmember Alex Scott holds a commanding lead over Matt Hecox for Oklahoma's 15th District State Senate seat. Scott currently has 61.51 percent of the vote, and Hecox has 38.49 percent.

8:10 p.m.

According to the AP, U.S. Rep. Tom Cole has won the U.S. House of Representatives Republican primary for Oklahoma's 4th congressional district.

8:03 p.m. 

According to the AP, attorney and former news anchor Abby Broyles has won the U.S. Senate Democratic primary.

7:44 p.m.

According to the Associated Press, U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe has won the Republican Senate primary.

Races to watch:

• Norman City Councilmember Alex Scott against Matt Hecox for Oklahoma's 15th District State Senate seat. Read our coverage of Scott's candidacy here.

• U.S. Senate Democratic primary between Elysabeth Britt, Abby Broyles, R.O. Joe Cassidy Jr. and Sheila Bilyeu. The winner will face U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe in November.

• U.S. House of Representatives Democratic primary between David Slemmons, Mary Brannon and John Argo. The winner will face U.S. Rep. Tom Cole in November.

• Norman City Council Ward 6 race between incumbent Bill Scanlon and Elizabeth Foreman.

• Oklahoma State Question 802.

Beth Wallis is a senior journalism major and political science minor, and news managing editor for The Daily. Previously, she worked as a junior news reporter covering university research.

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