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Third electric scooter company to come to Norman

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Gotcha scooters

Gotcha scooters on University Boulevard on May 6.

A new electric scooter has come to town.

Multi-vehicle ride-sharing company Gotcha will now offer electric scooters in Norman and on OU's campus. 

The South Carolina-founded company is the first in the nation to offer multiple electric vehicle ride-shares from a single provider, with products located in 25 states. Other Gotcha products are their electric dockless bikes, electric ride share vehicles and electric trikes. 

In Norman, the company only provides their scooter ride-share product, which can be unlocked for $1, and then cost 15 cents a minute after the initial cost. 

The company has a similar model to other ride-share companies by using an app with a GPS map showing where the closest scooters are located. The app also has a how-to guide, a "scan-to-ride" function, as well as a function to report an issue.

The app is downloadable from Google Play and the Apple App Store

The scooters can move up to 15 mph and have a kick-stand, light on the handlebars for night riding, and automatically slow down in low-speed zones. 

Unlike Bird, Gotcha has local "hubs" where the company asks users to return the scooters after use. 

After locating a scooter, users scan the scooter QR code located on its handlebars. After finishing the ride, the app will show users the location of the closest Gotcha hub to be returned for its next use. 

Gotcha has a boundary line around Norman from West Rock Creek Road to Highway 9, and the scooters must stay within that boundary. If a user ends their ride outside of the system boundary they will be charged a $50 retrieval fee, according to the app how-to guide. 

Norman Gotcha boundary

A screenshot of Gotcha's Norman boundary line on May 6

Correction: This story was updated at 8:35 a.m. May 8 to reflect Gotcha's accurate headquarters location. 

Assistant culture editor

Abigail Hall is a journalism junior and assistant culture editor at The Daily. She previously worked as an arts & entertainment reporter.

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