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Q&A with Saint Loretto about upcoming OKC performance with Flock of Pigs, Sophia Massad

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A former Norman Music Fest headliner and other local musicians will take the stage at a free music series in Oklahoma City Sept. 20.

Austin-based Saint Loretto and local artists Flock of Pigs and Sophia Massad will perform in OKC's Wheeler District for its second annual summer concert series at 7 p.m. Sept. 20. 

Saint Loretto's frontman, Evan Crowley, originally hails from Oklahoma City and said he looks for opportunities to come back to Oklahoma to perform. Under his current musical project Saint Loretto, he has performed with Oklahoma City-based musicians at Norman Music Fest for the last several years. 

In addition to the live performances, the Wheeler District will host food trucks, The Big Friendly beer bus and pop-up shops during the concert series, according to a press release

The event is free and open to the public from 711 p.m. at the Wheeler Ferris Wheel, located at 1701 S. Western Ave. in Oklahoma City.

The Daily spoke to Crowley ahead of the performance to talk about his background, the show and his music:

Q: You're originally from Oklahoma City, but you're based in Austin now. How long have you been there and why do you keep coming back?

A: I actually moved to Austin about two years ago. I still play music (in Austin) — I also come back to Oklahoma, but I definitely got my start playing in Oklahoma. 

I love coming back to Oklahoma City and getting to see fans, and so that'll be really cool. It's just great to see — every time I come back, I see the city growing and more that's happening, so that's always really cool to see that and see some people I haven't seen in awhile. 

Q: You were a headliner at Norman Music Fest this past year. Was that your first time to perform there?

A: No. I don't want to say that I was playing at the first (Norman Music Fest in 2008), but I think maybe at the second and third, and I believe most of them I have performed at in some band or another. 

Q: What is Saint Loretto and what does that mean to you?

A: The story behind the name I got from — there's this really beautiful story in the Catholic faith about the Holy House of Loreto, but apparently it was lifted by angels and carried multiple times, and I just thought that was a really fascinating story. I'm not Catholic, and I'm actually not religious either, but I remember reading about it at some point and thinking that was such a fascinating story.

I thought it was a neat parallel, and it's cheesy but I've always liked lifting people up with my music, so I thought that's an interesting parallel there. 

What does it mean to me? I guess the best way I could interpret that would be this project allows me a lot of things. It's an opportunity to try new things and reach people that I haven't been able to before and to kind of experience with stuff and get to know myself better — just really connect with other people and myself in ways that I don't think I was able to do before. 

Q: How would you describe your music? Your website uses the term "alternative pop," so is that what you consider it? 

A: I usually say that, and people always like to ask what you sound like. And I feel like we tend to hear The Killers or Phoenix or The Strokes, like The Strokes' newer stuff. So I usually say that genre combo and those bands, and people usually go, "Ahh." I wouldn't limit it to that, but that's usually what gets people to understand. 

Q: Flock of Pigs and Sophia Massad are also performing at the concert. Have you met them before and are you looking forward to performing with them?

I have several friends who have told me (Flock of Pigs are) really great and have a pretty eclectic sound, so I'm looking forward to seeing them.

I'm actually working with Sophia right now on some of her music and trying to get her some stuff down here in Austin — some shows and some contacts and some recording time.

She's worked really hard — she was nominated for the Gazette's Best of (OKC 2019). I just see her doing a lot, and I really admire people when they put in so much time.

Since I spent so much time in Oklahoma, I have a soft spot for Oklahoman musicians and people who are working hard. I like to do what I can to help out.

Q: Are you working on any new music?

A: I put my last album out earlier this year, and since then we went out to shows and put out a music video and just some things to promote that record. So just now coming off of that, but I'm definitely writing right now and experimenting with different sounds and things and trying to figure out what I really want to do next. 

Editor's note: This interview was edited for clarity and brevity. 

Culture editor

Abigail Hall is a journalism senior and culture editor at The Daily. She previously worked as the culture assistant editor, and arts & entertainment reporter.

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